Billion Franchise: The History and Trivia of Minions – 02/07/2022

Minions 2: Origin of Grua new animation by Universal Pictures, premieres on the big screen in Brazil this Thursday (30).

After Minions (2015), the first spinoff of the Despicable Me trilogy, the feature film explores Gru’s childhood in the mid-1970s, with a nostalgic soundtrack and amusing jokes that make young and old laugh.

Of course, the beloved villain Gru, voiced again in the Brazilian version by Leandro Hassum, is a major plot highlight, in a story that explains why and how he became an evil genius.

But the character’s loyal and funny sidekicks successfully share the limelight, and the already known partnership origin helps build a more assertive tone than seen in the predecessor.

Since the debut of Despicable Me (2010), the Minions have been stealing the show and captivating fans everywhere they go. No wonder, the first character-driven feature earned the franchise’s highest grossing, grossing over US$1.1 billion in theaters worldwide.

Discover 7 curiosities about the creation of these characters who marked the history of cinema:

1 | INSPIRATION IN THE CLASSICS

Minions co-creators Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud revealed that the yellow sidekicks were inspired by various characters from film and TV.

The Oompa Loompas, who work with Willy Wonka on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1971), were among them. Classic animations from Warner Bros. such as the cartoons of Bugs Bunny, Tweety and Sylvester and Jawas of star wars also served as the basis for the creation of the Minions.

2 | THE MINIONS WERE OUT OF THE ORIGINAL SCRIPT

According to the Los Angeles Times, the first screenplay for Despicable Me did not include Gru’s little sidekicks.

They were created later, in an attempt to humanize the protagonist. Originally, Gru was going to be a scowling goth villain accompanied by black ogres. In an interview, Franchise Director Pierre Coffin explained the change:

“We continue to find that the sillier the better. So the Minions, as these irresponsible childish characters, contribute to Gru’s appeal. They all love him the same way kids do. love their parents unconditionally and without question. And that immediately gave him some sympathy, because those little guys really loved him.”

Minions 2: Origin of Gru is now in theaters - Reading - Reading

Minions 2: Rise of Gru is in theaters now

Picture: Reproduction

3 | ALL MINIONS ARE MEN

Although many have this doubt, all Minions are “boys”. In an interview with The Wrap, Coffin explained the reason for his choice:

“Seeing how silly and stupid they are, I just couldn’t imagine the Minions being girls,” the filmmaker said. He also said that much to the dismay of fans, the creatures are unable to reproduce.

4 | THE DIRECTOR’S VOICE

In addition to being one of the creators, Pierre Coffin is also responsible for giving voice to the Minions.

In Despicable Me, Chris Renaud starred alongside the filmmaker in the role. already in the first film Solo characters, Coffin lends his voice to the 899 different versions of Minions in animation.

5 | THEY HAVE THEIR LANGUAGE

Yes, banana seems to be the Minions’ favorite word, however, they speak a specific language, Minionese.

Created especially for animation, it mixes words from several different languages, such as English, Korean, Spanish, French and Italian.

6 | MINIONS ARE IMMORTAL

In previous stories, we learn that the Minions have been around since “the beginning of time”, surviving for millions of years before finally meeting their favorite leader, Gru.

Since then, doubt about the lifespan of these creatures exists, but Brian Lynch, screenwriter of the moviesconfirmed on his Twitter: yes, what their stories show is a fact, and the Minions don’t die.

7 | RECORD FOR ANIMATIONS

Minions (2015) isn’t just the franchise’s biggest grosser – the feature also achieved a historic milestone for Illumination Entertainment, the studio that created it.

The animation was the first to break the Disney/Pixar hegemony and top $1 billion at the box office in theaters. Long live the Minions!

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